ICR -- Investigating Community Resilience
Every week Dave Barrons hosts a conversation about community resilience in the Northwestern Michigan. Each show investigates resilience through various themes with his guests. Select one of the themes in the left sidebar to watch past shows from that theme's perspective.

This is an archive site, please visit the new website - icr.nrec.org


Dave is joined, this week, by Bruce Odom

Dave is joined, this week, by Bruce Odom, owner of Odom Reusable Building Materials in Traverse City. The discussion focuses on building local economies. Bruce is active in the local discussion on how to generate more local economic activity that will keep local dollars in the local economy. He has created the web-site aslocalaspossible.blogspot.com to broaden and encourage that discussion. Bruce describes Bay Bucks and that effort to create a local currency; one that circulates exclusively in the local economy. Bruce and Dave also talk about the need for local investment options for the small investor, and speculate on the possibilities of a existing, local entity, such as the city owned electric utility, creating its own currency, fully acceptable in its service area, and thereby creating the capital needed for 'clean' energy investment.

Stephen Cousins joins Dave for Part 2

Stephen Cousins, Superintendent of the Traverse City Area Public Schools joins Dave for a two part discussion, this week and next, of the role of education in building community resilience. The discussion begins with a bit of history on how public education came to be structured as it is. Cousins recognizes the legacy issues for public education and the constraints imposed by connections to state and federal dollars, but he is optimistic  that by broadening the communication input to public education decision making local needs and planning can be effective. Steve is also optimistic that technological changes in the way curriculum can be delivered to students will move public education from an industrial/agrarian model to a broader and more responsive system.

Steve Cousins, Superintendent of Traverse City Public Schools, joins Dave - part 1

Stephen Cousins, Superintendent of the Traverse City Area Public Schools joins Dave for a two part discussion, this week and next, of the role of education in building community resilience. The discussion begins with a bit of history on how public education came to be structured as it is. Cousins recognizes the legacy issues for public education and the constraints imposed by connections to state and federal dollars, but he is optimistic  that by broadening the communication input to public education decision making local needs and planning can be effective. Steve is also optimistic that technological changes in the way curriculum can be delivered to students will move public education from an industrial/agrarian model to a broader and more responsive system.

Ed Bailey joins Dave to talk Energy

This discussion centers on energy issues. Ed Bailey, Director of Technical Education Services at NMC, joins Dave for the discussion. Ed is also the Convener of the Grand Visions Energy Network. Ed talks about the continuing need for energy education so individuals can see their own role in making energy changes. Dave wonders if the education effort readies people for the real need to cut back on total energy use. "Nimby-ism" is also discussed.  For energy production to become diverse and widely distributed with local input and control some developments must go in our backyard.

Dave & Bob discuss biodiversity as it relates to birds and urban gardens

Bob Russell and Dave Barrons join each other for this week's discussion. Much of it focusses on a book by Douglas W. Tallamy, Bringing Nature Home, which asserts that if you own a backyard or a garden, or are responsible for any sort of urban or suburban landscaping then you must become involved in creating native biodiversity. More 69 million acres of US land space has been converted to human managed urban or suburban landscaping. If biodiversity of bugs and birds is to be maintained, America's gardeners that must step in to replace the loss of native plants. Native plants support native insects and native insects are what support our bird populations. It isn't just a matter of aesthetics, birds and bugs are vital to the maintenance of a healthy ecosystem. Loss of diversity in our backyard plantings, lack of diversity in our population of bugs and birds, threatens not only backyard bird populations, but all of agriculture and ecosystem health.

Brad Kik joins Dave Barrons

For the first show of the new year Brad Kik co-founder and director of ISLAND, the Institute for Sustainable Living & Natural Design, joins Dave for a conversation about his organization featuring ISLAND's focus on numerous aspects of self-resilience. Very small scale 'farming' or backyard gardening and a host of DIY skills comprise many of ISLAND"S workshops. "Love Great Art" is part of their creed, as well, and Brad is especially clear discussing the value of art, the role of art, in sustaining community resilience.

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